The renegotiation of KORUS is a useful example of Trump`s trade agreements in practice. As we will see below, the renegotiations have made only minor changes to the agreement and could be adopted in such a way that the reality of Trump`s trade policy does not always correspond to rhetoric. However, the government`s concerns about trade with Korea have always been less acute than their concerns about trade with other trading partners, so the conclusion of the korus talks, with minor changes, can only reflect the government`s focus on other areas of trade policy and not on its overall approach to trade policy. On July 12, 2017, the USTR informed the Republic of Korea that it was convening a special meeting of the Joint Committee as part of the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement to renegotiate parts of the agreement. The special meeting of the Joint Commission between the United States and Korea was held on August 22, 2017. The second extraordinary meeting of the Joint Committee of the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement was held in Washington, D.C. on October 4, 2017. This result is worrying because it brings trade policy back to the 1980s and uses an instrument that operates outside current international rules. The commitment to unrelated national security issues to push Korea to make concessions marks a new approach to trade negotiations, which we will likely see more of the Trump administration.

Overall, the korus renegotiation is more a small change in U.S.-Korea trade relations than the global revolution that Trump and his trade advisers present as a revolution. That`s probably the right thing to do. However, concerns about KORUS were less prominent for the Trump administration than concerns about other trade relations in which the United States could take more aggressive action. The escalation of the trade dispute between the United States and China, the continued application of various unilateral tariffs by the government and the blocking of appointments to the highest court of the World Trade Organization are at the heart of the concerns. The resolution of these “hot button” issues will provide us with more information on the government`s ability to find a way to develop a coherent trade strategy that does not separate decades of trade liberalization. In early January 2018, the two countries held the first round of discussions on possible changes to the auto trade and the continued opening of the Korean agricultural market11. Just one week after Trump announced protective tariffs that would affect Korean washing machines and solar panels.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.1 2 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 This tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round.12 During this tense second round, the United States continued to insist on changes to the sale of cars in Korea. In the meantime, Korea has submitted detailed proposals to reform the Investor-State Dispute Settlement Mechanism (ISDR) and has expressed concerns about protective tariffs on washing machines and solar panels13.